Water based oils - the most under-rated thing ever!

by JoJo Henry
(Shrewsbury)

I've recently bought a set of water soluble oil paints, due to the fact I now have a very nosy small boy, poking around with thinners and turps!

I can honestly say they are amazing, especially if mixed with some medium that enhances the luminosity and speeds up drying.

The only disadvantage to them is the fact that they seem to stay wet forever(contrary to what you may imagine with something water based)!

I found them very responsive, far more than alkyd colours, and the pigments seem to be more vibrant.
Give them a go! I'll never look back.

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May 11, 2012
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blending
by: Jan cole

I too bought a few of the water based oils and the only difference I have found is when you go to blend. The water based oil does not blend very well


Feb 15, 2012
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Van Gogh H2O Oils
by: Anonymous

I have tried normal oils as well as two types of H2O oils and find the Van Gogh range brilliant. I find no difference between these and normal oils and have sold many of my oil paintings using this paint. These paints clean up in water and have little or no smell therefore if you have allergies as I do this may alleviate your problems. Also I run my own gallery -Hatchett Gallery and have clients visiting regularly therefore I cannot afford to have vapours/smells emanating as people visit my gallery and view my works. They also give I feel the same brilliance in colour and texture. :)

Jan 15, 2010
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how much liquin to add with water-based color
by: betsy

how much liquin to add with water-based color?

Jun 02, 2009
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Liquin & water mixable oils.
by: Kenny

Hi: Just wondering if you can use liquin with

the water mixable oils.

Would it speed the drying time.

thanks.

May 23, 2009
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Slow Drying
by: Anonymous

The only thing that causes water based oils to dry slowly is the use of mediums. They wil also add a glossy finish to your painting. I love them and only use water occasionally to make them more fluid.

Apr 01, 2009
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alternative to burnt umber
by: Timothy

I know this is a tips forum, but I would like to solicit a tip from someone who has had a problem with burnt umber drying and leaving a very dull and dry looking surface on the painting. I noticed a dryness when doing a night surf painting. I have always used burnt umber and ultramarine blue for the base color for sky and sea. I am thinking that the umber, being a pigment of clay might get old and degenerate after a few years. My tube (large) of Winsor&Newton burnt umber is about 8 years old. Does this happen to you? does anybody have an alternative mix to make the same color out of transparent pigments?

Mar 30, 2009
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The skinny about water-based oil paint
by: Anonymous

Hi, everyone! I wonder, as I read about water-based oils and their attributes, how expensive they are.
They sound too good to be true and the answer to the fat over lean school of thought. This certainly has my interest piqued, and I will give it a try, if it isn't too costly. How about a report of approximate prices from someone who has taken the step and also hopefully post some of the work and blow a trumpet to the rest of us...wadaya say?

Jun 06, 2008
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I Love Water Based Oils
by: Anonymous

The key difference between Water Mixable Oil color and conventional oil is its ability to mix and clean up with soap and water. The use of hazardous solvents is not necessary. There is a wide arrangement of colors, thinners, mediums made to go with the h20 oil paints.

I found the usual Drying time for h20 oil paints:
two days > prussian blue, umbers
around 5 days > greens, siennas, tat. white, black
around 5 or more days > alizarin crimson, cadmiums

You can blend when wet; make washes over dry; and paint over what is already dried. You can use acrylics for underpainting. you can add conventional oil on top (but you have to have solvents to clean) and this will greatly add to the drying time.


Mar 06, 2008
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Yes, I agree
by: Susan

I also just started using them and found them amazing and also, as you mentioned, much more kid and family friendly. They do seem to take a long while to dry so must plan accordingly I suppose. Good luck!

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