Bleeding (or fading) your watercolor wash

by Wendy S
(San Jose, Calif.)

When you want to soften (bleed or fade) an edge, plan ahead.


1) Have one brush for your paint and another soft brush for plain water. This will save you from wasting paint by rinsing it out of your brush constantly, and it will allow you to soften your work before a hard line appears.

2) After you lay down a swatch of color, use your clean, damp brush to "whisper" past the edge of the color, just barely touching it. Many people are tempted to actually move into the paint they just laid down, this will only serve to lift some of that paint and disrupt the nice wash with a streak. So think "whisper past". I recommend practicing on scrap paper as it takes a while to perfect.

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Thanks for the reminder!
by: Larry

Thanks for the reminder. This is a good technique.

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Bleeding (or fading) your watercolour wash
by: AnonymousJoyce

Hi Wendy, Thanks for your sujestion I wish I had known about it before I ruined untold attempts at watercolour Cheers Joyce.

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Tips
by: Marilyn

Hi,
You must be looking over mine as well. That is a great tip, especially when trying to do flowers.


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wash blending
by: Terry

I have done this but your suggestion about whisper past is excellent cause more often than not I do take out color. Thanks

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Thanks!
by: Anonymous

Thanks. Seems you were looking over my shoulder...

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